Deadbolts and Door Knobs

Lucas Dearaujo9/22/22

Deadbolts and Door Knobs 

Door knobs are the door's handle components that are formed more like a knob than a lever. The majority of doors in American homes will either have a doorknob or a door lever lock. The main distinction between door levers and door knobs is how they are shaped. Door knobs often cost less than lever locks and are more childproof and dog-proof than lever locks.


Compared to doorknobs and levers with an equivalent security grade, deadbolts frequently provide higher levels of protection. Deadbolt locks typically come in single or double-cylinder varieties. For locking and unlocking, single-cylinder deadbolts have a lock with a keyhole on the outside of the door and an inside flip-turn. Double-sided deadbolts are effectively two separate locks, however, they are usually installed on buildings with windows adjacent to doors and locksets. 


The vast majority of homes and businesses will rely on a deadbolt lock to keep intruders out. Homes with entry doors that are only secured by a doorknob or door lever lock are usually urged to have a new deadbolt lock installed to increase the security of the door. Lever locks and doorknob locks are easier to pick than deadbolt locks since the bolt goes much further into the frame. Deadbolts provide the highest degree of security against physical assaults by brute force, but they can be challenging to operate if a property settles or moves over time.


Deadbolt locks are often the best choice for providing the maximum level of security against physical attacks like a kick-in attack. Deadbolt latches are stronger against blunt force because they typically extend longer into the doorframe than a knob or lever lock. Because of its design and angle, which helps to deflect blows, the lock provides the highest level of physical security. In contrast, knob variations are designed to be simple for the user to operate and let them in and out of a door.


Most consumers don't want to install deadbolts when they replace their interior door knobs. Consumers must realize when it makes sense to switch a door knob for a deadbolt in order to understand the exceptions of this situation and similar ones.


An enhancement in security over a door knob is a deadbolt. A door knob cannot bear the amount of force that a lock can. Additionally, a deadbolt is far more difficult to operate than a door knob's spring-loaded latch, which can be unlocked with a credit card.


A lock is the least expensive form of physical security you can have. A lock in place of a doorknob conveys the amount of access control that is wanted. A deadbolt asks whether you have a key, while a doorknob tempts you to turn it.


Frequently, you can use the same deadbolt brand as the door knob you changed. Your two primary concerns before moving forward with this kind of deadbolt change should be if you require permission and whether a deadbolt is a right choice for the door. A deadbolt on a door may occasionally be against a particular safety regulation.


Overall, a deadbolt is a more significant upgrade than switching out one set of door knobs for another. When you swap out a doorknob for a deadbolt, you gain the security of the latter but give up the doorknob's aesthetic appeal and practicality. If you want to purchase deadbolt locks, then go visit our store now for the best selection of deadbolt locks on the market!